Home Visit Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


Home visit Chinese Medicine treatments are specially designed for the those who are either too busy to travel to a clinic, have difficulties with mobility, or simply are not feeling well enough to use transportation. Experience the healing power of Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine in the comfort of your own home. Chinese Medicine, including Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine, offers a range of physical benefits, including pain relief from chronic conditions like arthritis, migraine, and back pain. Acupuncture can also ease muscular tension and improve overall body function. You'll enjoy personalised care explicitly tailored to your physical health needs, ensuring maximum comfort and effectiveness.
Chinese Medicine's holistic approach addresses emotional and psychological well-being. Treatments are designed to reduce stress and anxiety, promoting a sense of peace and relaxation. Many report improved sleep patterns and a significant boost in mood following their treatments. Every treatment in the sanctuary of your own home is an opportunity to rejuvenate your mind, body and spirit.

✅ Avoid wasting your precious time and energy travelling to appointments ✅ Get treated in the most relaxing and private environment possible, your own home! ✅ Receive treatments when you are unable to leave your home ✅ If you have a chronic condition, you can save money with our Regular Treatment Packages

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School (Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine) Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence (Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia) Teaching: - Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) - Escrima, Arnis, Kali - Martial Arts - Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung) - Self Defence & Personal Protection - Women's Self-Defence - Muay Thai / Kickboxing - Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions. - 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功 - 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ http://www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts #escrima, #eskrima, #arnis, #kali, #martialarts, #fma, #filipinomartialarts, #health, #sanda, #kickboxing, #muaythai, #taichi, #taiji, #taijiquan, #qigong, #chikung, #meditation, #selfdefence, #womenselfdefense, #summerhill, #ashfield, #innerwest, #sydney, #chinesemedicine, #acupuncture, #traditionalchinesemedicine, #TCM, #orientalmedicine, #chinesemedicinepractitioner, #chineseherbalmedicine, #mobileacupuncture, #homevisitacupuncture

category: Chinese Medicine

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


Chinese Medicine Tips for Winter

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


Chinese Medicine Tips for Winter

As we head into winter, it’s easy to put health and wellness on the back burner. Winter brings colder temperatures, rain, biting wind, dry air and fewer hours of daylight, which can put more stress on your bodies, however traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) can help. Below are some Chinese Medicine tips for Winter

The Cold Can Cause Big Problems

The climate in winter is cold, and the cold air is congealing, thus is Chinese Medicine, this means the cold can easily obstruct the Qi energy and Blood circulation in our bodies. From a western biomedicine perspective, cold can constrict vessels and thicken the blood.

As a result, cold can lead to the recurrence or aggravation of many chronic diseases, especially those that affect the elderly, or cause pain in old injuries, for example. This includes serious life-threatening concerns such as stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, and myocardial infarction. The cold has been shown to increase the rate of incidence of these problems. Therefore, we should take special care to protect ourselves from the cold using TCM health tips for winter.

Keep your head, neck, back, and feet warm

In winter, ensure your head, neck, back, and feet are warm. Women should also pay special attention to keeping their abdomen warm, especially during their menstrual period.

This tip is especially important, and even more so for those with "Yang Deficiency", as these body parts are easily "attacked" by Cold. The experience of Chinese Medicine tells us that often “cold in winter will lead to febrile disease in spring”. For example if one catches too many colds in winter, allowing winter cold to enter the body, often one will suffer febrile disease, such as the flu in spring.

There are many home remedies and recipes one can prepare to prevent and soothe colds. For example , if you feel a cold coming on, you can boil water with ginger slices and brown sugar to drink. You can also cook porridge with scallions, ginger slices, and glutinous rice. You Chinese Medicine Practitioner can provide Chinese Nutritional advice on what foods are good for your individual case and winter in general, for example hearty soups and bone broths.

Spend more time in the sun to strengthen your "Yang" enegery

Winter is the season when depression is most common, which is related to lack of sunlight. Ancient Chinese Medicine wisdom advocates "basking in sun", especially "basking on the back" to maintain health during winter. Winter is a time of "Yin", and where "Yang" can decrease and more in a more hibernating state in the body.

The back is where the seven most important Acupuncture channels, or meridians, of the body, which transport and manage yang energy gather. Whenever possible, sit with your back to the sun and let it warm you slightly. The yang energy will be absorbed into the body through the acupuncture points on the back and then transported to all body parts.

After basking in the sun, there is sufficient yang energy in our bodies, and our meridians are unobstructed. With the Yang Qi replenished, one can feel refreshed and re-vitalised

Strengthen the kidneys and store essence

Entering winter, the kidney channel, or meridian, becomes active. The kidney is where life essence is stored. Winter is the best time to nourish and store essence. For people with kidney deficiency, kidney replenishment is particularly important in winter.

Kidney essence mainly relies on nourishment and conservation. Correct nutrition with kidney nourishing foods, Chinese Exercises such as Taiji Quan & Qi Gong, and Meditation practices, as well as Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine can all help support and nourish the Kidneys during Winter.

Eat nutritious foods, in moderation

It's important to eat nutritious & nourishing foods during winter, but it's easy to put on weight over winter, especially if one is less active in winter months.

Chinese Medicine believes that the "five flavors" relate to the five internal organs. Bitterness enters the heart, acidity enters the lungs, sourness enters the liver, saltiness enters the kidneys, and sweetness enters the spleen. If one wants to eat sour food, it may be because one’s liver fire is too strong. People with kidney deficiency instinctively want to add salt to mobilize kidney qi.

We should satisfy our appetite in moderation, but especially in winter we should not indulge it. We should also target our nutrition to support the organise, especially in winter, for example, sea cucumbers, kelp, and other seafood are salty and can enter the kidneys to replenish kidney deficiency. Millet and lotus seeds can strengthen the spleen. Tomatoes, citrus, bananas, and goji berries can nourish the liver.

Chinese Medicine Treatments - Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal Medicine, Chinese Nutrition, Chinese Exercise and Moxibustion (Heat Therapy)

And of course receive regular Chinese Medicine treatments such as Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine and learning Chinese Exercises such as Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)

If we incorporate TCM healthcare practices, such as Chinese Nutrition principles and recipes, and Chinese Exercises such as Taiji Quan (Tai Chi), Qi Gong (Chi Kung) & Meditation into our daily lives, we can enjoy Winter fully without worrying about being attacked illness or disease.

category: Chinese Medicine

tags: Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Chinese Nutrition


How Acupuncture Works

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Acupuncture

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


Believe in Yourself!

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Philosophy

tags: Philosophy, Buddhism, Daoism


Acupuncture for Chronic Pain - Pain Relief and Pain Management - Summer Hill Acupuncture

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture Home Visits for Back Pain Relief and Pain Management! 

www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com


category: Acupuncture

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


About Acupuncture

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture is part of the ancient practice of Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM is a system of healthcare that has evolved over thousands of years to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. TCM believes that the body's vital energy, called qi (pronounced chi), flows along specific channels or meridians. If the qi is balanced then the person has spiritual, emotional, and physical health. But when the qi isn't in balance, disease may occur. Qi can be blocked, causing unbalance between the yin and yang. This refers to two opposite but connected principles in Chinese philosophy TCM uses many approaches to create harmony between yin and yang and restore correct flow of energy through the meridians. One of these approaches is acupuncture. Acupuncturists believe the human body has more than 2,000 acupuncture points. They are linked through the various meridians. The use of acupuncture on certain points within the meridians is believed to improve the flow of blocked or stagnant qi. Acupuncture can unblock these meridians. This restores movement of qi and improves health.

Complete article:

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/acupuncture


Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine
Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School
(Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine)
Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong
Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence
(Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia)
Teaching:
- Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) - Escrima, Arnis, Kali
- Martial Arts
- Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)
- Self Defence & Personal Protection
- Women's Self-Defence
- Muay Thai / Kickboxing
- Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions.
- 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功
- 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ
http://www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com
http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com
http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts

category: uncategorised

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) Chinese Exercise

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: uncategorised

tags: Tai Chi, Taiji Quan, Chinese Medicine


Never stop training and learning

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Martial Arts

tags: Tai Chi, Chinese Exercise


Health Benefits of Tai Chi (Taiji Quan)

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Without Good Health - you cannot look after and manage yourself, your family, your business, or "give" to friends, family, those in need & society

All the money and prestige in the world is worthless without Good Health and Life Balance.

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine
Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School
(Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine)
Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong
Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence
(Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia)
Teaching:
- Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) - Escrima, Arnis, Kali
- Martial Arts
- Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)
- Self Defence & Personal Protection
- Women's Self-Defence
- Muay Thai / Kickboxing
- Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions.
- 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功
- 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ
http://www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com
http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com
http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts

category: uncategorised

tags: Tai Chi, Taiji Quan, Chinese Medicine


Harvard University - Benefits of Tai Chi (Taiji Quan)

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-health-benefits-of-tai-chi

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine
Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School
(Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine)
Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong
Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence
(Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia)
Teaching:
- Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) - Escrima, Arnis, Kali
- Martial Arts
- Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)
- Self Defence & Personal Protection
- Women's Self-Defence
- Muay Thai / Kickboxing
- Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions.
- 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功
- 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ
http://www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com
http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com
http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts

category: Tai Chi

tags: Tai Chi, Taiji Quan, Chinese Medicine


How Acupuncture Works

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Acupuncture

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


Yin Yang Balance and Harmony for Great Health

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


The absolute fundamental essence of Taiji Quan (Tai Chi Chuan, or Tai Chi) is Balance - Yin-Yang Harmony, Mental & Physical (Mind & Body) Balance and Harmony - and this is a fundamental principle of The complete Taiji Quan for Health and/or Martial Arts.

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine
Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School
(Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine)
Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong
Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence
(Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia)
Teaching:
- Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) - Escrima, Arnis, Kali
- Martial Arts
- Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)
- Self Defence & Personal Protection
- Women's Self-Defence
- Muay Thai / Sanda Kickboxing
- Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions.
- 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功
- 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ
http://www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com
http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com
http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts
#escrima, #eskrima, #arnis, #kali, #martialarts, #fma, #filipinomartialarts, #health, #sanda, #kickboxing, #muaythai, #taichi, #taiji, #taijiquan, #qigong, #chikung, #meditation, #selfdefence, #womenselfdefense, #summerhill, #ashfield, #innerwest, #sydney, #chinesemedicine, #acupuncture, #traditionalchinesemedicine, #TCM, #orientalmedicine, #chinesemedicinepractitioner,#chineseherbalmedicine, #mobileacupuncture

category: uncategorised

tags: Balance, Tai Chi, Taiji Quan, Chinese Medicine, Qi Gong


Chinese Nutrition - Celery (Qin Cai)

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Celery (Qin Cai) in TCM:

In terms of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Celery, called Qin Cai in Chinese, is known for its ability to clear heat and resolve dampness. It also helps to regulate water circulation and calm the spirit. In general the ancient Chinese medical texts cite that it enters the stomach, urine bladder, kidney, and liver.


Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine
Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School
(Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine)
Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong
Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence
(Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia)
Teaching:
- Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) - Escrima, Arnis, Kali
- Martial Arts
- Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)
- Self Defence & Personal Protection
- Women's Self-Defence
- Muay Thai / Kickboxing
- Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions.
- 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功
- 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ
http://www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com
http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com
http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts
#escrima, #eskrima, #arnis, #kali, #martialarts, #fma, #filipinomartialarts, #health, #sanda, #kickboxing, #muaythai, #taichi, #taiji, #taijiquan, #qigong, #chikung, #meditation, #selfdefence, #womenselfdefense, #summerhill, #ashfield, #innerwest, #sydney, #chinesemedicine, #acupuncture, #traditionalchinesemedicine, #TCM, #orientalmedicine, #chinesemedicinepractitioner, #chineseherbalmedicine, #mobileacupuncture

category: Chinese Nutrition

tags: Chinese Nutrition, Traditional Chinese Medicine


How Acupuncture Works

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Acupuncture

tags: Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine


Menopause and Chinese Medicine

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Menopause, also known as the ‘change of life’, is the end of a menstruation for women, when a woman’s ovaries stop releasing an egg each month and can no longer conceive children.

Diagnosis of menopause is confirmed when a year has passed since the last menstrual period.

Menopause usually occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, however every woman is different and it may occur earlier or later than this range. There cam also be a transitional stage, known as pre-menopause, which can start several years before menopause, where women have declining fertility and fluctuating hormone levels. These fluctuating hormone levels are a cause of many of the symptoms associated with menopause, such as hot flushes and mood swings, for example.

In Chinese Medicine, menopause is the natural decline in what’s known in Chinese Medicine theory as “Kidney Essence”. This Essence is prenatal energy, stored in the kidney which enables the abilities of fertility, libido, regeneration of the body, and tissue elasticity and strength. Therefore, the fundamental changes that occur during menopause can be attributed to kidney deficiency, especially kidney Yin deficiency.

As Chinese Medicine treats the health and wellness of the whole person, it takes into account the individual's presenting physical and emotional symptoms in making a diagnosis and treatment plan

Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine treatment aims to balance energies and promote the smooth free flow circulation of energy, resolving and any energy or blood stagnation in the body. Chinese Herbal Medicine helps in clearing heat and nourishing Yin between treatments. Chinese medicine does not work like hormone therapy, which continues to artificially maintain hormone levels, but instead aims to treat one’s overall health and well-being. This is done through individualized treatments for each woman based on her personal condition and stage of menopause.

All Chinese Medicine treatment aims to restore and maintain the natural harmony in your body and emotions, to promote it's natural healing abilities.

Book via Summer Hill Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine website www.SummerHillAcupuncture.com


Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School

(Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine)

Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong

Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence

(Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia) 

Teaching: 

- Filipino Martial Arts (FMA)  - Escrima, Arnis, Kali

- Martial Arts

- Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)

- Self Defence & Personal Protection

- Women's Self-Defence

- Sanda Kickboxing / Muay Thai

- Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions.

- 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功

- 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ

http://SummerHillAcupuncture.com

http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com

http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com

https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture

https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi

https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts

#escrima, #eskrima, #arnis, #kali, #martialarts, #fma, #filipinomartialarts, #health, #sanda, #kickboxing, #muaythai, #taichi, #taiji, #taijiquan, #qigong, #chikung, #meditation, #selfdefence, #womenselfdefense, #summerhill, #ashfield, #innerwest, #sydney, #chinesemedicine, #acupuncture, #traditionalchinesemedicine, #TCM, #orientalmedicine, #chinesemedicinepractitioner,#chineseherbalmedicine,#mobileacupuncture

category: Acupuncture

tags: menopause, Chinese Medicine, Summer Hill Acupuncture


Build up your immune system with Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine ready for

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Build up your immune system in preparation, with Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine

A highly transmissible Covid subvariant is “taking off” in Australia and will likely produce a bulge in new cases, disease experts warn.

The FLuQE subvariant is ripping through the US, and University of South Australia biostatistician Adrian Esterman said the mutation would hit Australians in just a few weeks

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/experts-warn-new-contagious-fluqe-covid-subvariant-taking-off-in-australia/news-story/



category: Chinese Medicine

tags: covid, flu, acupuncture, immune system, chinese herbal medicine


Chinese Herbal Medicine

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Chinese Herbal Medicine

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal Medicine


How Acupuncture Works

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: uncategorised

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


How Acupuncture Works

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Acupuncture

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


Acupuncture - Most widely used complementary health therapies

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Of all the complementary health therapies available in Australia today, acupuncture is one of the most widely used. In fact, 80 percent of general medical practitioners refer patients to acupuncturists.

Since its origins in China 3,000 years ago, acupuncture has been used to treat many health issues. Fine needles are inserted into the skin at specific points to balance the flow of “Qi” or vital life force energy.

Of all the complementary health therapies available in Australia today, acupuncture is one of the most widely used. In fact, 80 percent of general medical practitioners refer patients to acupuncturists.

An acupuncturist is a practitioner who has undergone studies in the practice to achieve their professional status. While some undertake a short course, others study for a degree in Chinese Medicine to gain the skills and knowledge needed to practise this ancient art.

Because acupuncture is holistic, taking into account a patient’s overall health, your practitioner will get a picture of your general wellbeing and recommend a treatment course based on this. They may use other complementary therapies alongside acupuncture to achieve the best results.

The theory is that your practitioner can tap into your energy system through 350 points in your body by inserting fine needles to different depths. This helps restore the energy flow to its proper state, stimulating healing and preventing further issues.

Some scientists say that acupuncture points are sites where the body’s tissue, nerves, and muscles can be manipulated. This improves blood flow, which in turn helps your body function to its best ability, and also helps release neurotransmitters. These include dopamine and serotonin, which affect your mental wellbeing, and other neurotransmitters that blocks pain.

Because needles are used, you may be wondering does acupuncture hurt? Don’t worry. The needles are very fine, so you will be unlikely to feel pain but may experience mild stinging or aching.

Acupuncture is used for many problems, including pain, musculoskeletal disorders, issues associated with aging or nutrition and obesity – in fact a whole range of diverse areas!

And acupuncture for fertility is an area that is also gaining ground. It is believed to stimulate blood flow to reproductive organs, as well as relieving stress and balancing hormones.

The benefits of acupuncture are many. Practitioners say that because it kick-starts the body into healing itself, it is an entirely natural process. It is also considered low-risk as long as the correct procedures are followed and have few side-effects. Other treatments can be used alongside acupuncture and can help patients who don’t like to or can’t take painkillers.


category: Acupuncture

tags: Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture, Complementary Medicine


Seated Qi Gong

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


Qi Gong (Chi Kung) Deep Breathing Health Nourishing Exercises can be done standing, seated or lying down. More importantly when you are in ill health where you cannot sit up for long ... 

Lying Qi Gong, may progress your health and strength to where you CAN sit up for periods, then Sitting Qi Gong over time may allow you to improve you health to point where you can do Standing (still) Qi Gong, that in turn may lead to improved health and leg strength & balance to where you can perform moving (walking) Qi Gong.

Seated Qi Gong is also an option for those in Wheelchair or limited mobility, and so on.

category: Qi Gong

tags: Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Taiji Quan, Breathing Exercise


Addressing the Emotional Body is one of the huge missing links in the healing industry

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


Traditional Chinese Medicine, including Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine, specialises in Mind-Body Healing System can be very beneficial to emotional health and disorders. TCM understands the deep connection between Mental Health and Physical Health ... where the emotions can cause physical illness and vice versa, physical dysfunction & illness can effect the emotional health of a person.


Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine
Chinese Medicine Clinic & Martial Arts School
(Chinese Medicine Practitioner. Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine)
Summer Hill Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) & Qi Gong
Summer Hill Filipino Martial Arts & Self Defence
(Summer Hill 2130. Sydney, NSW. Australia)
Teaching:
- Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) - Escrima, Arnis, Kali
- Martial Arts
- Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) & Qi Gong (Chi Kung)
- Self Defence & Personal Protection
- Women's Self-Defence
- Sanda Kickboxing / Muay Thai
- Defensive Tactics, Control & Restraint for Security Staff & related Professions.
- 武术馆 - 学习武术、自卫 (防身术)、女子防身(防身术)、太极拳、气功
- 武道道場 - 武道、護身術、女性の護身術、太極拳、気功 を学ぶ
http://SummerHillAcupuncture.com
http://www.SummerHillMartialArts.com
http://www.SummerHillTaiChi.com
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillAcupuncture
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillTaiChi
https://www.facebook.com/SummerHillMartialArts

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category: Chinese Medicine

tags: Chinese Medicine, Emotional Health


Feeling bad after Qi Gong? - Purging Toxins

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


Qi Gong is always supposed to feel good, right? After all, isn’t that the whole point of the practice?

While it's true, Qi Gong is intended to help us feel more centered, alive, and healthy, it may sometimes surprising when the practice leads to unpleasant feelings such as nausea or fatigue. However in most cases, if studying and practicing Qi Gong under a genuine Teacher, this is often a case of the body purging toxins from the body, sometimes known as a 'healing crisis', and also common in other healing modalities, such as Massage Therapy, where one may not feel so great the next day after (as the body purges toxins), but then feels great the following day after that

Generally, for people already in general good health, the body can purge toxins without much obvious effect and one may not even notice, apart from feeling good

The purging process involves the releasing of old stagnant energy & blood, as well as toxins from the body. This can also involve the letting go of negative emotions, dysfunctional thought patterns, and even physical ailments. Since Qi Gong is the practice of releasing such stagnant energy & toxins, while cultivating health and vitality, the process of purging plays an important role in the process.

Letting go of sadness or resentment opens up opportunities for joy and happiness, releasing of stressful thoughts allows focusing of the mind on the present moment. Physically, letting go of tension and tightness in the body leads to greater relaxation and release of physical stress.

While purging is a occasionally a necessary part of growth, it isn’t always so enjoyable. As toxins leave the body, you may feel nauseous, have low energy or might even feel like are sick with a cold. Such symptoms are the body’s natural detoxification process taking place.

If not sure, check with the Teacher, and such symptoms should not over resolve after and day or two, and importantly following this you should feel good. If systems persist the cause should be investigated.

For some practitioners, when purging negative energy from the body it can lead to fatigue, nausea, soreness, or a mild headache, some can even feel a bit "hungover" after Qi Gong practice.

Sometimes these sensations can occur both while practicing Qi Gong, as well as after. Sometimes, they don’t show up until the next day.

If you experience such sensations while you practice, just take note of the sensations in your mind and continue practicing if it doesn’t feel too strenuous. If the unpleasant experience feels especially strong or unpleasant, take a break until you’ve regained enough energy to keep practicing, of conclude the practice. Seek advice from the Teacher.

Sometimes unpleasant sensations are more common when trying new exercises for the first time, or when you’re practices that are longer than your usual practice time. Typically, unpleasant experiences go away as you purge the toxic energy from your body and become more experienced with the exercises you’re learning.

It’s important to note that there is a distinction between unpleasant sensations and pain. If an exercise leads to sharp pain , or some severe reaction, it’s important to listen to your body and stop doing the exercise, and seek advice.

You can also do several things to limit the effects such as the below:

Drink More Water

It’s always important to drink plenty of water, but this is especially true after practicing Qi Gong. Staying hydrated will better help the body to more easily purge toxins out.

Rest and Sleep

Purging often leads to fatigue. If you feel tired after practicing Qi Gong, be sure to take it easy and get plenty of rest. You may even want to consider taking a nap.

Quality rest and sleep can work wonders when it comes to recharging the mind and body, and during sleep is when the body heals.

Eat Healthy Food

Consuming healthy food is a great way to replace old energy with nourishing Qi. Like water and sleep, it’s always important to eat well. However, this is especially true when you’re replenishing your body after a healthy ‘detox.’

Drink Pu'er (Pu Erh) Tea

Traditionally Pu'er, sometimes written as Pu Erh, Tea (普洱茶) is drunk to boost the Qi and help purging old energy and toxins from your body.

Recieve a Treatment

Chinese Herbal Medicine, Acupuncture or Massage can all be used to assist and speed up the purging process.


If there are no other factors, it may just be the healing process of your body, However, if unsure of the reason for feeling unwell, always consult your Teacher


category: Qi Gong

tags: Qi Gong, Chinese Medicine


The Effects of Qi Gong for Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


The Effects of Qigong for Hypertension: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1155/2021/5622631

Hypertension has been a global public health problem. Qigong as a complementary and alternative therapy is often used to reduce blood pressure. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of Qigong on blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

Study Conclusion

Qi Gong can effectively reduce blood pressure levels, and 90–120 minutes every week for more than one year or 180–240 minutes every week for more than half a year has a better effect in hypertension patients. Moreover, according to the subgroup analysis of the total Qi Gong exercise amount, there may be a dose-response relationship between Qi Gong exercise amount and blood pressure level in hypertension patients. However more high-quality studies are needed in this area of research.

category: Qi Gong

tags: Qi Gong, Chinese Medicine


Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis through Acupuncture

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


category: Acupuncture

tags:


Sun Simiao - The Chinese Physician's Ethical Framework

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

"Whenever a great physician treats diseases, he has to be mentally calm and his disposition firm. He should not give way to wishes and desires, but has to develop first a marked attitude of compassion. He should commit himself firmly to the willingness to take the effort to save every living creature.
If someone seeks help because of illness, or on the ground of another difficulty, a great physician should not pay attention to status, wealth, or age; neither should he question whether the particular person is attractive or unattractive, whether he is an enemy or a friend, whether he is Chinese or a foreigner, or finally, whether he is uneducated or educated.
He should meet everyone on equal ground; he should always act as if he were thinking of himself. He should not desire anything and should ignore all consequences; he is not to ponder over his own fortune or misfortune and thus preserve life and have compassion for it.
He should look upon those who have come to grief as if he himself had been struck, and he should sympathize with them deep in his heart. Neither dangerous mountain passes nor the time of day, neither weather conditions nor hunger, thirst nor fatigue should keep him from helping whole-heartedly.
Whoever acts in this manner is a great physician for the living. Whoever acts contrary to these demands is a great thief for those who still have their spirits!"
- Sun Simiao

category: Chinese Medicine

tags: Sun Simiao


Traditional Chinese Medicine - Complementary Therapies of Cancer Treatment & Recovery

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

https://www.cancercouncil.com.au/cancer-information/living-well/complementary-therapies/individual-therapies/chinese-herbal-medicine/

https://www.cancercouncil.com.au/cancer-information/living-well/complementary-therapies/individual-therapies/acupuncture/

Tai Chi & Qi Gong, along with other Traditional Chinese Medicine modalities such as Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine can be complementary Therapies in the Treatment and Recovery of Cancer. It can also help manage symptoms from treatments Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy, for example.

category: Chinese Herbal Medicine

tags: Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal Medicine


What is Acupuncture? And does it Work?

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

category: Acupuncture

tags: Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, TCM


Does Acupuncture Hurt?

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine


Acupuncture needles are incredibly thin and flexible (about the same thickness as a piece of hair), with insertion generally being painless, with the odd one occassionaly that feels like a mosquito bite and lasts about the same amount of time. The common reaction by new patients to acupuncture is, "is that it?", as the pain level is very low to zero.

Once inserted you may feel pleasant sensations such as a slight dull ache, tingling, warmth, slight itchness or heaviness sensation, for example, which are all normal and called a "De Qi" (得氣) reaction, meaning the Qi (氣 Life Energy)is arriving or moving through the area.

Hypodermic needles, those that GPs & Nurses use, such as those used in blood tests, are hollow, which is partly why they cause pain. Acupuncture needles are much thinner, a fraction of the diameter of hypodermic needles, about 3-4 times finer, and not hollow but solid.

Acupuncture needles are so thin, that around 40-50 Acupuncture needles can fit inside the tip of a typical hypodermic needle used for blood tests.

A Practitioner explains and demonstrates how Acupuncture needles don't hurt:

Some people may feel a slight sensation or pressure during needle insertion, but this is usually brief and not painful, however Acupuncture is generally a relaxing and comfortable experience.


category: Acupuncture

tags: Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, Tradition Chinese Medicine, TCM


David Beckham Reveals Acupuncture Is the 'One Thing' That Repairs His Muscles After Working Out

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

An iteresring article on how acupuncture has benefited David Beckham through his football career.

https://www.inquisitr.com/david-beckham-reveals-acupuncture-is-the-one-thing-that-repairs-his-muscles-after-working-out

category: Acupuncture

tags: Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine


Tensegrity in Taiji Quan (Tai Chi) and Life

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Tensegrity  in Tai Chi was brought up by a Student in this mornings Lessons:

Regarding Tensegrity in Tai Chi, that is spot on ... tensegrity is a vital  aspect of the internal "engine" of Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) both for health and fighting, it should be noted that Taiji Quan is based on observations of the Snake and White Crane.

As your studies in Tai Chi advance you'll learn and use a lot about internal aspects such as tensegrity, compression, expansion and so on. 

Initial one is focused on the external coordinations and bio mechanics, even just where the left foot goes and right hand goes, body awareness, spacial awareness, opening and stretching your body. 

For now you can just be aware of this kind of tensile strength quality.

Both these animals have a great deal of tensegrity and tensile strength in their movements.

Aspects of spiraling,  wrapping, coiling and so on are qualities from the snake.

If you have never held a snake, they are quite different than you may think ... only when they are dead at "soft" and super floppy ..... 

Again that kind of supper soggy celery type of floppy Tai Chi one sometimes sees is wrong (too yin) according to the principles and concepts of the art ... including Yin-Yang Balanced

That is not the physical quality of a living, vibrant, powerful snake, only one that is dead, lifeless and the Qi and Spirit has left its body. 

If you ever get a chance to hold a snake safely, at say a wildlife park or something it would be useful.

I also talk about a bull whip or cattle whip ... if you ever feel one , or even see it on TV etc ... they are soft soft and floppy, the bend and have some flexibility, but not floppy, neither are they  rigid 

Remember Yin-Yang .... hard and soft, rigid and flexible etc

Steele wrapped in Cotton wool

Tensegrity is vital in Tai Chi, but also in every day Life as well.

Be flexible, but don't be a pushover.

Dao De Jing, chapter 76:

"When alive, man is pliable and soft;  at death, he becomes rigid and hard.

When alive, grasses and trees are flexible and tender;  at death, they become withered and petrified or rotten.

Therefore, rigidity leads to death, flexibility results in survival.

It is because of this, the inflexible army would be defeated, like stiff trees would be broken by wind.

The big and rigid would be overtaken by the nimble and flexible.

The strong and mighty topple from their place; The soft and yielding rise above them all."

 The Crane is Yang and the Snake is Yin



category: Tai Chi

tags: Tai Chi, Taiji, Taiji Quan


Anatomical Evidence of Acupuncture Meridians

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Anatomical Evidence of Acupuncture Meridians in the Human Extracellular Matrix: Results from a Macroscopic and Microscopic Interdisciplinary Multicentre Study on Human Corpses

NOTE: The below link contains medical images of a cadaver

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448339/

Abstract:

For more than 2500 years, acupuncture has been applied to support the healing of different diseases and physiologic malfunctions. Although various theories of the meridian system and mechanisms were formulated to explain the functional basis of acupuncture, the anatomical basis for the concept of meridians has not been resolved. The aim of the present study was to search for replicable anatomical structures that could relate to meridians.

We suggest that not only fascia, especially the fascia corporis externa, but also deeper parts form the anatomical substrate of acupuncture meridians. In addition, parts of muscles, tendons, and ligaments follow the meridian course. Our observations build an anatomical basis for examining TCM principles and therapies, and it supports a holistic approach to diagnosis and treatment of diverse diseases.


category: Acupuncture

tags: Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine


Why osteoarthritis of the knee is called

by Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Herbal Medicine

Summer Hill Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine

Why osteoarthritis of the knee is called "a wound that does not heal" and why Tai Chi is an effective treatment

Conclusion: Knee OA is a wound that does not heal primarily because repetitive adverse forces on the knee cause synovial macrophages and then local chondrocytes, osteocytes and fibroblasts to dysregulate and stop the normal healing and repair process. Tai Chi mitigates adverse forces on the knee and stabilizes the joint, creating the conditions whereby the normal healing and repair process can resume. Further research is needed.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/38089871/

category: Tai Chi

tags: Osteoarthritis, Arthritis, Tai Chi, Taiji Quan, Qi Gong



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